AP United States History Weekly Schedule
Semester 2
2022

PowerPoint Slides

Period 1-2 (1491-1754)

Period 3 (1754-1800)

Period 4 (1800-1848)

Period 5 (1844-1877)

Period 6 (1865-1898)

Period 7 (1898-1945)

Period 8-9 (1945-present)


Week 15-18

05/9-6/10


Oral Interview Project


1. Oral Interview Worksheet due 5/18

2. Reflection due 6/10

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Week 14

05/2-5/6


AP Exam Friday May 6th 8:30


AP Exam Review Period 9 1980-present


Tom Richie AP Review (YouTube)


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Week 13

04/25-5/1


1. AP Exam Review period 7-8


2. C31 From the Age of Limits to the Age of Reagan 1980s


2. Sem 2.3 Midterm C27-30 Thursday 4/28

Sem 2.3 review 2022


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Week 12

04/18-4/24


Sem 2.3 Midterm C27-30 Thursday 4/28

Sem 2.3 review 2022


1. Read and Take Notes

C30 The Crisis of Authority 1970's

2. Tuesday AP Review period 5-6

3. Read

The Civil Rights Movement

The Sixties

The Vietnam War and the My Lai Massacre 


Lecture Outlines

The Tumultuous 1960s

The Vietnam War 1964-1973

Watergate Crisis of the 1970s

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Week 11

04/11-4/17


1. Read and Take Notes

C28 The Affluent Society 1950s
C29 The Ordeal of Liberalism 1960-1968

2. Tuesday AP Review period 3-4

3. Read

Cold War Warm and Hearth

The Civil Rights Movement

The Sixties

The Vietnam War and the My Lai Massacre 


Lecture Outlines

The Tumultuous 1960s

The Vietnam War 1964-1973


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Week 9

03/21-3/25


1. Read and Take Notes

C27 The Cold War 1946-1955


2. Read

Post War Politics and the Cold War

Anti Communism in the 1950s


3. Assessment 3/25 C24-27 Friday 3/25


Lecture Outlines

Origins of the Cold War 1945-1965


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Week 8

03/14-3/20


Truman and the Bomb

1. Read The Bomb-A Never ending Controversy

2. You Decide: Was President Truman Correct in His Decision to Drop Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki?


1. Read and Take Notes

C26 American in a World War


2. 1920s DBQ due 3/18 in-class and posted to Google Classroom and Turnitin.com

Analyze how modernization and changing beliefs led to social transformations that improved the standard of living for many while also contributing to increased political and social conflicts during the 1920s

 

Content Outline for Period 7 Key Concept 7.2

A revolution in communications and transportation technology helped to create a new mass culture and spread “modern” values and ideas, even as cultural conflicts between groups increased under the pressure of migration, world wars, and economic distress.


7.2. New technologies led to social transformations that improved the standard of living for many, while contributing to increased political and cultural conflicts.


A. New technologies contributed to improved standards of living, greater personal mobility, and better communications systems.


B. Technological change, modernization, and changing demographics led to increased political and cultural conflict on several fronts: tradition versus innovation, urban versus rural, fundamentalist Christianity versus scientific modernism, management versus labor, native-born versus new immigrants, white versus black, and idealism versus disillusionment.


C. The rise of an urban, industrial society encouraged the development of a variety of cultural expressions for migrant, regional, and African American artists (expressed most notably in the Harlem Renaissance movement); it also contributed to national culture by making shared experiences more possible through art, cinema, and the mass media.


The Thesis Formula: X. However, A, B, and C. Therefore, Y. or Although X, Y because ABC.


Historical Causation: What are the major causes or consequences of “event” and what were the most important causes or consequences of “event”? X = least important cause or consequence, with an explanation why A, B, C = most important causes / consequences, explanations why, broken up thematically Y = your assertion statement



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Week 7

03/7-3/13


1. Read and Take Notes

C24 FDR and the New Deal


2. Read and Take Notes

C25 The Global Crisis (Foreign Policy 1920-1941)

The Diplomacy of the New Era

Isolationism and Internationalism

From Neutrality to Intervention


During the 1920s, the United States tried to promote world peace through diplomatic means.In 1921, representatives from nine Asian and European nations met in Washington to discuss ways to ease tensions in the Pacific. The conference resulted in a 10-year moratorium on the construction of battleships and an agreement that for every five naval vessels owned by the United States or Britain, Japan could have three ships, and France and Italy could own one and three-fourths ships.In 1928, the French foreign minister, Aristide Briand, and Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg attempted to outlaw war. The Kellogg-Briand Pact, which was eventually signed by 62 nations, renounced war as an instrument for resolving international disputes. The Kellogg-Briand Pact lacked an enforcement mechanism. Cynics said the treaty had all the legal force of an "international kiss."


During the Great Depression isolationist sentiment surged. In 1935, some 150,000 college students participated in a nationwide Student Strike for Peace, and half a million signed pledges saying that they would refuse to serve in the event of war. A public opinion poll indicated that 39 percent of college students would refuse to participate in any war, even if the country was invaded. Anti-war sentiment was not confined to undergraduates. Disillusionment over World War I fed opposition to foreign entanglements. "We didn't win a thing we set out for in the last war," said Senator Gerald Nye of North Dakota. "We merely succeeded, with tremendous loss of life, to make secure the loans of private bankers to the Allies." The overwhelming majority of Americans agreed; an opinion poll in 1935 found that 70 percent of Americans believed that intervention in World War I had been a mistake. Isolationist ideas spread through American popular culture during the mid-1930s. The Book of the Month Club featured a volume titled Merchants of Death, which contended that the United States had been drawn into the European war by international arms manufacturers who had deliberately fomented conflict in order to market their products. From 1934 to 1936, a congressional committee, chaired by Senator Nye, investigated charges that false Allied propaganda and unscrupulous Wall Street bankers had dragged Americans into the European war. In April 1935--the 18th anniversary of American entry into World War I--50,000 veterans held a peace march in Washington, D.C.


Between 1935 and 1937, Congress passed three separate neutrality laws that clamped an embargo on arms sales to belligerents, forbade American ships from entering war zones and prohibited them from being armed, and barred Americans from traveling on belligerent ships. Clearly, Congress was determined not to repeat what it regarded as the mistakes that had plunged the United States into World War I. By 1938, however, pacifist sentiment was fading. A rapidly modernizing Japan was seeking to acquire raw materials and territory on the Asian mainland; a revived Germany was rebuilding its military power and acquiring land bloodlessly on its eastern borders; and Italy was trying to restore Roman glory through military might.   


3. Read Article

The New Deal


4. SAQ due 3/13


Lecture Outline

FDR and the New Deal

American Foreign Policy 1919-1941

The Rise of Totalitarianism 1930s

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Week 6

02/27-3/4


1. Read and Take Notes Digital History

C23 The Great Depression 1929-1938


This section examines why the seemingly boundless prosperity of the 1920s ended so suddenly and why the Depression lasted as long as it did. It assesses the human toll and the policies adopted to combat the crisis of the Great Depression. It devotes particular attention to the impact on African Americans, the elderly, Mexican Americans, labor, and women. In addition to assessing the ideas that informed the New Deal policies, this section examines the critics and evaluates the impact of the New Deal.


The Market Crashes
Why It Happened
The Great Depression in Global Perspective
The Human Toll
The Dispossessed

President Hoover
Franklin D. Roosevelt
The Bonus Army


2. Read Article


3. Lecture Outline


3. Midterm C 19-23  March 3rd

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Week 5

02/22-2/27


1. Read and Take Notes

C22 The New Era 1920-1929


2. Read Article

The Roaring 1920s 


Lecture Outlines

The Roaring Twenties 1920-1928


3. 1920s Primary Source documents due 2/27


4. Midterm C 19-23  March 3rd

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Week 4

02/14-2/20


1. Read and Take Notes

C21 America and the Great War 1914-1920


2. Read Article

3. Twenty Questions due 2/20

Lecture Outlines

World War I 1914-1918

Aftermath of World War I

Foreign Policy 1865-1919 Notes


(Week 5 2/22-2/27)
1. Read and Take Notes

C22 The New Era 1920-1929


Lecture Outlines

The Roaring Twenties 1920-1928


Read Article

Roaring 1920s 


2. Jazz Age SAQ due  2/27

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Week 3

02/7-2/13


1. Read and Take Notes

C21 America and the Great War 1914-1920


2. Read Article
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Week 2

01/31-1/6


1. Read and Take Notes

C20 The Progressive Era 1890-1920


2. Read Articles

The Politics of Reform

Roosevelt and the Square Deal

3. C19 Quiz 2/1

4. DBQ American Empire due 2/6
submit to google classroom and turnitin.com

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Semester 2

Week 1

01/24-1/30


Read and Take Notes

1. C19 From Crisis to Empire 1865-1914

The Stirrings of Imperialism

War with Spain

The Republic as Empire


2. C21

The "Big Stick" America and the World p. 584-589


Politics

The Depression of the Mid-1890s
The Farmers' Plight
Populism
The Election of 1896
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
The Populist Crusade and Restrictions on African Americans


2. Read Articles 

The United States and the Caribbean 1877-1920

The War Against Spain in the Philippines 1898

The Open Door Policy: the U.S. and China


4. Political Cartoon analysis 1/30


Lecture Outline

The Spanish American War